Tag Archives: Cambridge

Celebrate Hisoty and Culture at Mount Auburn Cemetery

23 Sep

 

Bigelow Chapel

I’m back. I know, I know, you’re excited. And you should be.

So now that you’re done groaning, I can tell you about something that I stumbled upon (not using the service, but still).

Last year I wrote an entry concerning Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge. I know that most of you don’t think about walking around a cemetery as having a good time, but it can be a lesson in culture and history. Plus some of the gravestones are pretty freakin’ cool (pictures are in the other post. And on my Facebook page).

This weekend, meaning tomorrow and the day after, Mount Auburn Cemetery is celebrating its 180th birthday! Saturday, September 24, 2011 is when the majority of the festivities are going to happen.

The following is what is happening (taken from their Facebook page):

• Free hour-long guided walking tours will be held at 9, 11, 1, & 3 highlighting notable moments from our 180 years.

• New self-guided materials will also be available for you to explore the Cemetery on your own.

• Stop in the Visitors Center from 9 – 4:30 for birthday refreshments and to peruse a selection of discounted publications.

• Bigelow Chapel will be open 1 – 4 PM where staff photographer Jennifer Johnston’s Seasons of Mount Auburn exhibit will be on display and docents and staff will be on hand to answer questions and point out the chapel’s interesting features.

 I really suggest checking it out. Washington Tower provides one of the most amazing views of Boston and the grounds are gorgeous. If you would rather wait for a day that you can leisurely stroll around without running into people, this is not the weekend to visit. But if you are interested and have time I say go for it.

How to get to Mt. Auburn Cemetery: It is in Cambridge, but not really accessible by the T. I suggest going to Harvard Square (Red Line) and taking either the #71 or #73 bus to Mt. Auburn Cemetery (right at the intersection of Brattle St.). Once you enter the main gate, you can go into the Visitor’s Center and buy a map for 50 cents. I highly recommend that because you obviously want to see the famous (dead) people. But, as always, just wander and explore.

Pretend You’re a Braniac: Visit MIT

11 Aug

If I were smarter and into science and into math and could handle all the braniacs, my dream school would be MIT. It is absolutely incredible and one of my favorite places.

I first discovered it during a trolley tour of Boston when I was younger. All I could remember was that it looked so cool, and weird. I then rediscovered it my sophomore year of college when I lived at the Hyatt Regency Cambridge for a semester. Because I was all of a sudden on that side of the river, my best friend and I would explore Cambridge on the weekends when we got bored- and when we didn’t want to walk to a subway across the BU bridge (every time I go over that bridge I think I am going to die).

I am not going to go into every detail of how amazing every building at MIT is; you will have to walk the campus for yourself and open your eyes. But I am going to give you some direction and advice.

MIT Stata Center

If you walk down Vassar Street you will see much of what makes MIT unusual. The Ray and Maria Stata Center is unlike (almost anything else). It was designed by Frank Gehry, a world-renowned architect. If I were you I would definitely go inside of it and walk around, look out the windows, go on the roof. It is basically MIT’s student center so anyone is allowed in. Also on Vassar you will see a funny shaped building with different colored square windows. It’s a dorm. Yup, it is a dorm. You will also pass by Henry G. Steinbrenner Stadium. And yes, that Steinbrenner is related to the Yankees (Henry was George’s father. He went to MIT and donated a lot of money to them).

View from inside the Stata Center

So there is the unusual, the “out-there”, but there is also the classic. Walk down Memorial Drive between Ames Street and Massachusetts Avenue and you will see some of the most gorgeous, classical architecture there is to see in the area. When you get to Harvard Bridge, turn up Mass Ave and keep your eyes peeled. The stone work and random structures abound (not sure if that is the right word, but it sounds good!).

Lincoln Laboratory MIT on Memorial Drive

How to get to MIT: Take the red line to Kendall/MIT (clever, right?). There are also many, many buses that take you right into Kendall: CT2 (weekdays only, found that out the hard way while it was pouring), 64, 68, 85 and others that run through MIT’s campus (47 goes close as well).

Hang With the Dead: Mt. Auburn Cemetery

5 Nov

Washington Tower at Mt. Auburn Cemetery- Most amazing views of Boston/Cambridge

I call my parents almost every night for a few minutes, and during that time my dad and I exchange fun facts (usually centering around sports or my hometown). Also, almost every week my dad send me an envelope containing articles that I may find interesting. They range from an article about the upcoming UConn game to a feature on a ukelele collection in my brother’s college library. The envelopes also usually contain a little money for groceries (the best part!).

During the summer I got one envelope and the only thing in it was a map of a cemetery. Really, Dad? A cemetery? Come on. But to be honest the map was colorful and cartoon-ish so I actually took a look at it.

I was surprised. Mt. Auburn Cemetery looked interesting. There are two churches on the property and a tower. Many famous people are buried there including Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Robert Gould Shaw and Fannie Farmer (my parents use her cookbooks religiously). There are also many memorials there including one for Mary Baker Eddy. There are also some monuments, such as a Sphinx that honors the Civil War soldiers who fought and died. After reading the Yelp reviews (which suggested going in the fall- peaceful, calm, relaxing) I was intrigued.

So…I decided to go one afternoon that I had off.

Gorgeous landscape and the Sphinx dedicated to the Civil War soldiers

There are so many interesting graves there and many are in funny shapes. There are some that look like paper (the person must have been a writer) and ones that are shields. Some have babies sleeping on top and some are dogs. Bigelow Chapel was adorable. The climb up Washington Tower was exhausting (although I climbed up some ridiculous towers in Europe so this was nothing) but the views were absolutely unbelievable. Perhaps the best views of Boston (the picture at the top of this blog is from the top of the tower).

Mary Baker Eddy Memorial

A few graves at the cemetery

Bigelow Chapel
Bigelow Chapel

I went and spent about an hour and a half there walking around and looking at everything. I did not see the entire cemetery and I stayed away from the active burial ground. Some people were there exploring just like me, others were taking their morning/afternoon jogs. But everyone was enjoying the oldest landscaped cemetery in the country, even me, which is somewhat surprising (gotta say, the Tower helped).

How to get to Mt. Auburn Cemetery: It is in Cambridge, but not really accessible by the T. I suggest going to Harvard Square (Red Line) and taking either the #71 or #73 bus to Mt. Auburn Cemetery (right at the intersection of Brattle St.). Once you enter the main gate, you can go into the Visitor’s Center and buy a map for 50 cents. I highly recommend that because you obviously want to see the famous (dead) people. But, as always, just wander and explore.

I walked to Harvard Square after, which is a little over a mile. After walking through the cemetery it was too much and I was exhausted, but I would suggest exploring Harvard Square/University a little at the same time. Old cemetery plus old school equals an interesting day for sure.

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